Arthur Milikh

Arthur Milikh

Executive Director

View Research and Commentary

Arthur Milikh is the executive director of The Claremont Institute’s Center for the American Way of Life. His work focuses on the tradition of American political thought and the freedom of speech.

Previously, he was the Associate Director of the Center for American Studies and AWC Family Foundation Fellow at The Heritage Foundation. Prior to Heritage, he worked at the House Committee on Armed Services and at The Hudson Institute.

Milikh’s writings have appeared in The Claremont Review of Books, National Affairs, City Journal, Real Clear Politics, Law & Liberty, and American Greatness.

Milikh holds a B.A. from Emory University, a Masters from the University of Chicago, and is a Ph.D. candidate at The Catholic University of America.  He was a Lincoln Fellow in 2016.

Robert Delahunty

Robert Delahunty

Scholar

View Research and Commentary

Robert Delahunty is a Washington Fellow at The Claremont Institute’s Center for the American Way of Life. His research focuses on national sovereignty and anti-trust law.

He was LeJeune Chair and Professor of Law at the University of St. Thomas School of Law in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Prior to this, he was in the Senior Executive Service at the Office of Legal Counsel in the U.S. Department of Justice. He also served as Deputy General Counsel at he White House Office of Homeland Security, as special advisor to the Solicitor of Labor at the U.S. Department of Labor, and as special advisor to the Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. He was an Associate at Sullivan & Cromwell in the litigating division.

Delahunty is a graduate of Harvard Law School, Oxford University, and Columbia University. He was a member of the philosophy faculty at Durham University in the United Kingdom and was a tutor in philosophy at Oriel College, Oxford University.

Delahunty has written numerous articles on constitutional law, international law, and Shakespeare and the law. He has published in The Wall Street Journal, The Federalist, Law & Liberty, National Review Online, and elsewhere. He co-authored a book on war with Antonio F. Perez and authored a book on the 17th century philosopher Baruch Spinoza.

David P. Goldman

David P. Goldman

Scholar

View Research and Commentary

David P. Goldman is a Washington Fellow at The Claremont Institute’s Center for the American Way of Life. His research focuses on China, American manufacturing, and trade policy.

Goldman is Deputy Editor of Asia Times, where he has written the "Spengler" column since 2001. He is also a Senior Fellow of the London Institute for Policy Research. He previously was a partner at Reorient Group (Hong Kong), and global head of fixed income research at Bank of America and Cantor Fitzgerald. He was also a Managing Director at Credit Suisse and Bear Stearns, a member of Institutional Investor's All-America Fixed Income Team, and was the Pulliam Fellow at Hillsdale College in 2017.

His books include You Will Be Assimilated: China's Plan to Sino-Form the World (2020), How Civilizations Die (2011), and It's Not the End of the World — It's Just the End of You (2011).

Goldman writes frequently for The Claremont Review of Books, The Wall Street Journal, First Things, Newsweek, Law & Liberty and Tablet Magazine. He has published numerous scholarly articles on economics, finance, and intellectual history.

Carson Holloway

Carson Holloway

Scholar

View Research and Commentary

Carson Holloway is a Washington Fellow at The Claremont Institute’s Center for the American Way of Life. His research focuses on American constitutionalism and the liberal nationalism of the American Founding.

He is Ralph Wardle Diamond Professor of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Political Science at University of Nebraska, Omaha. He has been a Visiting Fellow in Princeton University’s James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions and a Visiting Fellow in American Political Thought at The Heritage Foundation.

He is co-editor, with Bradford P. Wilson, of the two-volume work The Political Writings of Alexander Hamilton (Cambridge University Press, 2017). He is also the author of Hamilton versus Jefferson in the Washington Administration: Completing the Founding or Betraying the Founding? (Cambridge University Press, 2015).

His scholarly articles have appeared in the Review of Politics, Interpretation: A Journal of Political Philosophy, and Perspectives on Political Science, and he has written more popular articles for The Wall Street Journal, First Things, The New Criterion, National Affairs, Law & Liberty, Public Discourse, The Federalist, and National Review.

Professor Holloway received his B.A. from the University of Northern Iowa and his Ph.D. from Northern Illinois University.

Joel Kotkin

Joel Kotkin

Scholar

View Research and Commentary

Joe Kotkin is a Washington Fellow at The Claremont Institute’s Center for the American Way of Life. Described by The New York Times as “America’s uber-geographer,” he is an internationally-recognized authority on global, economic, political, and social trends. His latest book, The Coming of Neo Feudalism: A Warning to the Global Middle Class (Encounter Books, 2020), deals with the issue of declining upward mobility and growing inequality in almost all middle and high-income countries.

Kotkin is the Presidential Fellow in Urban Futures at Chapman University in Orange, California and Executive Director of the Houston-based Center for Opportunity Urbanism. He is Senior Fellow for Heartland Forward and Executive Editor of the widely read website NewGeography.com. A regular contributor to the National Review, City Journal, Daily Beast, Quillette and Real Clear Politics, he also writes a weekly column for Digital First Media, which owns numerous daily newspapers in the greater Los Angeles region.

Kotkin recently completed several studies on Texas urbanism, the future of localism, the changing role of transit in America, and, most recently, California’s lurch towards feudalism. He is co-author of a report published in 2018 on the revival of the American Heartland for the Center for Opportunity Urbanism. As director of the Center for Demographics and Policy at Chapman, he was the lead author of a major study on housing, and recently, with Marshall Toplansky, published a strategic analysis for Orange County, CA.

Jesse Merriam

Jesse Merriam

Scholar

View Research and Commentary

Jesse Merriam is a Washington Fellow at The Claremont Institute’s Center for the American Way of Life. His research focuses on the constitutional difficulties presented by the civil rights movement, including anti-discrimination and affirmative-action law.

He is currently an Associate Professor of Government and the Pre-Law Advisor at Patrick Henry College in Purcellville, Virginia. Prior to that, he served for six years as an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Loyola University, Maryland. He has been a Visiting Fellow in American Political Thought at The Heritage Foundation, has worked as an appellate litigator at a D.C. constitutional law firm, and has been a research associate at the Pew Research Center's Forum on Religion & Public Life.

Merriam has published over a dozen academic print articles in top law-review and peer-reviewed journals, covering such diverse topics as legal conservatism, the meaning of the rule of law, church-state relations, and the theory and practice of originalist constitutional interpretation. In addition, his other publications have appeared in Law & Liberty, National Review Online, The American Conservative, American Greatness, and The Claremont Review of Books.

Merriam holds a B.A. in government from Wesleyan University, an M.A. in philosophy from Johns Hopkins University, a Ph.D. in political science from Johns Hopkins University, and a J.D. from The George Washington University Law School.

Joshua Mitchell

Joshua Mitchell

Scholar

View Research and Commentary

Joshua Mitchell is a Washington Fellow at The Claremont Institute’s Center for the American Way of Life. His current research focuses on identity politics and the tradition of Western political thought.

Mitchell is currently professor of political theory at Georgetown University. From 2002-05, he was the Chairman of the Government Department. In 2005, he was on the start-team for Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service in Doha Qatar, and has taught courses there periodically for the past 15 years. During the 2008-10 academic years, Mitchell took leave from Georgetown and became the Acting Chancellor of The American University of Iraq - Sulaimani. He has been a Visiting Fellow in American Political Thought at The Heritage Foundation.

He is author numerous books, including: Not by Reason Alone: Religion, History, and Identity in Early Modern Political Thought (University of Chicago Press, 1993), The Fragility of Freedom: Tocqueville on Religion, Democracy, and American Future (University of Chicago Press, 1995), Plato's Fable: On the Mortal Condition in Shadowy Times (Princeton University Press, 2006), Tocqueville in Arabia: Dilemmas in the Democratic Age (University of Chicago Press, 2013). His most recent book is American Awakening: Identity Politics and Other Afflictions of Our Time (Encounter Books, 2020). His next book project is entitled The Gentle Seduction of Tyranny.

In addition, Mitchell is an avid conservationist, working to restore his small forest on the Eastern Shore, and working to develop the next generation of solar-electric sailboats.

Dan M. Peterson

Dan M. Peterson

Scholar

View Research and Commentary

Dan M. Peterson is a Washington Fellow at The Claremont Institute’s Center for the American Way of Life. An attorney and constitutional litigator, Peterson’s scholarship focuses on legal and policy issues concerning the natural, legal, and constitutional right to keep and bear arms, including under the Second and Fourteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution and state analogues.

A graduate of the Harvard Law School, Dan is a longtime member of the United States Supreme Court bar.

Early in his career, Peterson served as General Counsel for the Gulf & Great Plains Legal Foundation in Kansas City, Missouri (now Landmark Legal Foundation). During the latter part of the 1980s, he was Executive Director of the Center for Judicial Studies in Washington D.C. and Associate Editor of Benchmark magazine. For many years he was a full equity partner with Fulbright & Jaworski LLP (now Norton Rose Fulbright), where he concentrated on federal regulatory and administrative law.

In 2010, Peterson began his own law practice focusing on the Second Amendment and firearms regulatory issues. In addition to litigating Second Amendment and other firearms-related cases, he has engaged in multiple lawsuits against the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives.

Peterson is a member of the bars of Virginia, the District of Columbia, Iowa (inactive status), and Texas. He is admitted to practice before numerous federal courts including the First Circuit, Second Circuit, Fourth Circuit, Fifth Circuit, Eighth Circuit, Ninth Circuit, Tenth Circuit, D.C. Circuit, and Court of Federal Claims.

Peterson's writings have appeared in the Houston Law Review, The American Spectator, American Legion Magazine, The Legal Times, Delaware Lawyer, The World & I, USA Today, Jurist and The London Daily Mail. He has taught at the George Mason School of Law (now Antonin Scalia Law School) and Baylor College of Medicine.

He earned his B.A. degree in political science magna cum laude from the University of Iowa.

Scott Yenor

Scott Yenor

Scholar

View Research and Commentary

Scott Yenor is a Washington Fellow at The Claremont Institute’s Center for the American Way of Life. His research focuses on feminism, sexual liberation, and on dismantling the rule of social justice in America’s universities.

Yenor is author of Family Politics: The Idea of Marriage in Modern Political Thought (Baylor, 2011). His latest book is The Recovery of Family Life: Exposing the Limits of Modern Ideologies (Baylor 2020). In addition, his academic publications have appeared in Law & Liberty, The Federalist, City Journal, and The Claremont Review of Books. He has been a Visiting Fellow in American Political Thought at The Heritage Foundation.

He is a political science professor at Boise State University. He earned his Ph.D from Loyola University, Chicago. He has five children and lives with his wife, Amy, in Meridian, Idaho.

Join us as we form a new Right and reclaim America's institutions.